Fort Collins Lambkins

Where Excellence is Expected

Social Studies Courses

The purpose of Social Studies Coursework is to passionately develop an awareness and understanding of the history of all Americans and the globalized world.

Course Descriptions

World Geography

Geography provides students with an understanding of spatial perspectives and technologies for spatial analysis, awareness of interdependence of world regions and resources and how places are connected at local, national and global scales. World Geography is a survey course that examines the physical characteristics as well as the human impact in various regions of the world. Students will analyze physical, cultural, political, economic, and urban geography within a regional context.

AP US History

The AP US History course analyzes political, social, economic, religious and military issues. The chronology will begin at the pre-Columbus experience and conclude with America as a world power in the late 20th Century. This course requires extensive reading, writing, research and participation. The reading - text, historical documents and historiography - is at the college freshman/sophomore level and students may expect to read perhaps 50-100 pages a week. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in United States History.

US History

The US History course analyzes political, social, economic, religious and military issues. This course is a chronological survey of events and people that characterize each of the major eras in U.S. History. The Eras studied include: The Americas to 1600, The Colonial Era, The Revolutionary Era, Nation Building, The Expanding Nation, Civil War and Reconstruction, Development of the Industrial United States, The Progressive Era, Emergence of the United States as a World Power, the 20's Prosperity and Problems, Depression and New Deal, World War II and Post War US and contemporary US.

African-American Humanities

This semester class explores the world views and creative arts of the cultures in Africa and the Americas. The course will include, but not be limited to, the study of history, philosophy, religion, literature and the arts. Study will include relating events and concepts of Africa and the Americas with those of Western Civilization.

Asian Humanities

Students will study the cultures of India, China, Japan, and other Asian countries through historical events, art, literature, philosophy, music, and architecture. Study will include relating events and concepts of Asia with those of Western Civilization.

American Government

The focus of this course is U.S. National Government and politics. It will emphasize the institutions and political forces that have shaped the U.S. National Government and examine the behavior of individuals in the American political system and the non-institutional forces that influence decision-making in U.S. politics (such as political parties, interest groups, and the media.) This course enables the student to understand the functions of the U.S. National Government and how citizens can access the decision-making process. Students will gain a fuller understanding of the American political system.

Psychology

Psychology will pursue the fascinating question of why human beings behave as they do. Students consider the role of our biological makeup and our social environment in influencing why we respond as we do to a wide variety of situations. Famous experiments and psychological theories will be studied in an attempt to discover why people develop as they do behaviorally.

World History

This course is a chronological survey of events and people that characterize each of the major eras in World History with a primary emphasis on Western Civilization. The Eras studied include Emergence of Civilization, The Classical Civilizations, The Expansion and Interaction of Civilizations, The Early Modern World, The World in the 19th Century and the World in the Contemporary Era up to and including World War II. This course is Part 1 of the World Studies requirement for the graduation requirements beginning with the freshman class in the fall of 1998.

AP European History

This course is a chronological survey of western civilization beginning with Greece and Rome with an emphasis on 1450 to the present. Specific areas of emphasis will be on political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history. This course is for the advanced student and will involve reading and analyzing primary source material. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in AP European History.

Anthropology

The chief objective of anthropology is to increase the students’ awareness of and appreciation for the rich diversity of human behavior and beliefs. The course examines the physical and cultural origins and development of the human species, taking us back in time some three million years. Students will investigate the techniques and evidence used to formulate theories about prehistoric and modern people who possess lifestyles dramatically different from our own. Anthropology is taught from an evolutionary perspective.

AP Psychology

The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in AP Psychology.