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Mathematics Course Descriptions

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Math Pathways 2024-25.pdf

Math

 

 

Pre-Algebra: 5 credits – grade 9 – Mathematics – prerequisite: teacher recommendation

Pre-Algebra is a quarter-long mathematics course, designed to solidify a students’ understanding of arithmetic and to provide a foundation for the key concepts taught in Algebra I. Upon successful completion, students will progress to Algebra 1. Students cannot self-select this class.

 

6230 | Algebra 1A/1B: 10 credits – grade 9, 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: Completion of Connected Math 3 or Pre-Algebra

This course formalizes student understanding of solving linear equations, solving linear inequalities, graphing linear functions, writing linear functions, and solving systems of linear equations/1B This course builds on concepts in Algebra 1A, focusing on exponential functions, polynomial equations and factoring, graphing quadratic functions, solving quadratic equations, and radical functions and equations

 

6240 | Geometry: 10 credits – grade 9, 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: recommended ‘C’ or higher in Algebra 1A/1B

This course focuses on basics of Geometry, reasoning and proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, transformations, and congruent triangles/ 1B This course builds on concepts learned in Geometry 1A, focusing on relationships with triangles, quadrilaterals and other polygons, similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, circles, and circumference, area, and volume.

 

6226 | Algebraic Concepts: 5 credits – grade 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: Geometry, teacher recommendation

This course is designed to prepare students for Algebra 2. Topics taught include graphing and solving linear functions, multiplying binomials and factoring, graphing quadratic equations and solving quadratic equations. 

 

6250 | Algebra 2: 10 credits – grade 9, 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: recommended ‘C’ or higher in Geometry and Algebra 1

Building on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions in Algebra 1, students focus on linear functions, quadratic functions, quadratic equations and complex numbers, polynomial functions, rational exponents and radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational functions, probability, and data analysis and statistics.

 

7907CE FRHS | FRCC Career Math: 5 credits/3 college credits -  grade 9,10,11,12 - Mathematics- prerequisite: Geometry, Algebra 1

MAT1140: Covers material designed for career and technical students who need to study particular math topics. Topics include measurement, algebra, geometry, statistics, and graphs. These are presented at an introductory level and the emphasis is on application.

 

7905CEFRHS | FRCC Math for Liberal Arts:  5 credits/3 college credits - grade 9,10,11,12 - Mathematics - prerequisite: Geometry, Algebra 1

MAT1240: This course highlights connections between mathematics and the society in which we live and is intended for liberal arts majors. Topics include set theory and logic, mathematical modeling, probability and statistical methods, and consumer mathematics. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-MA1 category.

 

6145 |  Probability And Statistics 10 credits- grade 9,10,11,12 - Mathematics -  no prerequisite

This course provides the concepts and methods for dealing with uncertainty. Applications for this course will be in marketing, research, business, and entertainment. We will explore, interpret, and judge the validity of statistical claims.

 

6295 | AP Statistics: 10 credits – grade 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: recommended ‘B’ or higher in Algebra 2

AP Statistics is a year long mathematics course centered around four main topics: exploring data; planning a study; probability as it relates to distributions of data; and inferential reasoning. Students will be expected to propose and carry out a statistical study. This course is designed to help prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam.

 

"Pre-Calculus"both completed in the same semester - grade 9, 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: A or B in Algebra 2

              6275SCEFRCC College Algebra (Quarter) (MAT1340): 5 credit/4 college credits –

           9357QCEFRCC College Algebra (Quarter) (MAT1420): 5 credit/3 college credits –

FRCC College Algebra and FRCC College Trig are both combined in this rigorous, fast-paced, semester-long course.  See course descriptions for these two FRCC courses below.

 

6275SCEFR | FRCC College Algebra (Semester):  10 credits/4 college credits - grade 9, 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: A or B in Algebra 2

MAT 1340: Focuses on a variety of functions and the exploration of their graphs.  Topics include: equations and inequalities, operations on functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear and non-linear systems, and an introduction to conic sections.  This course provides essential skills for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) pathways. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-MA1 category.

 

9357SCEFR | FRCC College Trigonometry (Semester): 10 credits/3 college credits – grade 9, 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: A or B in College Algebra

MAT 1420:  Explores trigonometric functions, their graphs, inverse functions and identities.   Topics include: trigonometric equations, solutions of triangles, trigonometric form of complex numbers, and polar coordinates. This course provides essential skills for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) pathways. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-MA1 category.

 

6290 | AP Calculus AB: 10 credits – grade 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: recommended ‘B’ or better in College Algebra and College Trigonometry/Analytic Geometry

Calculus is a study of all topics traditionally offered in a freshman college calculus course. Topics covered are limits, derivatives of algebraic functions, applications of the derivatives, applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions and methods of integration. This course will help prepare the student to take the AP-AB Calculus test.

 

6291 | AP Calculus BC: 5 credits – grade 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: AP Calculus AB

Calculus is a study of all topics traditionally offered in a freshman college calculus course. Topics covered are limits, derivatives of algebraic functions, applications of the derivatives, applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions and methods of integration in function parametric vector and polar modes. This course also introduces series and different series conversion tests. This course will help prepare the student to take the AP-BC Calculus test.

 

9883CEFRHS | FRCC Calculus III with Engineering Applications:  5 credits/5 college credits – grade 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – prerequisite: AP Calculus BC

MAT2431: Focuses on the traditional subject matter of multivariable Calculus with an additional emphasis on word problems and problem solving. Topics include vectors, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, analytic geometry, multiple integrals, line integrals, Stokes', Divergence Theorems and Green's Theorems, and applications. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-MA1 category.

 

9300CEFRHS |  FRCC Differentiated Equations: 10 credits/3 college credits - grade 9,10,11,12 - Mathematics - prerequisite: Calculus III

MAT2562: Explores ordinary differential equations with an introduction to select topics in linear algebra. The course covers first- and second-order differential equations, series solutions, Laplace transforms, linear algebra, eigenvalues, first-order systems of equations, and numerical techniques for solving differential equations.

 

Alternative Math/Computer Science Courses:

1751 | Game Design A: 5 credits – grades 9, 10, 11, 12 – Math/Computer Science or Fine & Applied Arts  – no prerequisite

Game Design combines problem-solving techniques with computer game design and implementation to introduce the student to basic gaming and computer science concepts. Students design, implement, and test computer games using software that allows for basic game creation through a wide variety of game creation tools. At FCHS: students will use a variety of software and applications.  Students will use Construct 2 to create 6 projects.  Students will learn how to use Piskelapp.com to create their own 'Sprites', characters, tilesets, backgrounds, etc.  The final weeks students will apply what they have learned to create their own Unique Original Video Game all while learning about gameplay, color palettes, game progressions, and more!  

 

1754 | Game Design B: 5 credits - grades 9, 10 ,11, 12 - Fine & Applied Arts, Math & Computer Science - prerequisite: Game Design A

Game Design B combines problem-solving techniques with computer game design and implementation to introduce the student to basic gaming and computer science concepts. Students design, implement, and test computer games using software that allows for basic game creation through a wide variety of game creation tools.

 

1766 | Web Design Foundations A: 5 credits – grades 9, 10, 11, 12 – Math/Computer Science or Fine & Applied Arts – no prerequisite

Web Design Foundations is a course that prepares students with work-related web design skills for advancement into postsecondary education and industry. The course is intended to develop fundamental skills in both theory and practical application of the basic web design and development process, project management and teamwork, troubleshooting and problem solving, and interpersonal skill development. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the web design and development industry; where interaction with a "client" is indicated in the standards, it is expected that students' peers or the instructor may serve as mock clients in lieu of an actual relationship with an industry partner. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in the Web Design program of study  At FCHS: students will learn how to use HTML, CSS, and an introduction to JavaScript using Visual Studio Code.  Students will also learn how to design websites using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and even Adobe Animate. 

 

1767 | Web Design Foundations B:  5 credits – grades 9, 10, 11, 12 – Math/Computer Science or Fine & Applied Arts- prerequisite Web 1 or approval 

Web Design Foundations is a course that prepares students with work-related web design skills for advancement into postsecondary education and industry. The course is intended to develop fundamental skills in both theory and practical application of the basic web design and development process, project management and teamwork, troubleshooting and problem solving, and interpersonal skill development. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the web design and development industry; where interaction with a “client” is indicated in the standards, it is expected that students’ peers or the instructor may serve as mock clients in lieu of an actual relationship with an industry partner. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in the Web Design program of study. At FCHS: students will learn advanced stills in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript using Visual Studio Code.  Students will also learn how to design websites using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and even Adobe Animate. 

 

6320 | Computer Science Foundations A: 5 credits – grades 9, 10, 11, 12 – Mathematics – no prerequisite

Introduces students to the discipline of computer science and programming. Algorithm development, data representation, logical expressions, sub-programs and input/output operations using a high-level programming language are covered. Intensive lab work outside of class time is required.

 

6330 | AP Computer Science A: 10 credits – grade 9, 10, 11, 12 – Elective – prerequisite: enrollment in Algebra 2 or Teacher Recommendation

The AP Computer Science A course is an introductory course in computer science. Because the design and implementation of computer programs to solve problems involve skills that are fundamental to the study of computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods. In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course.

 

6331 | AP Computer Science Principles A: 10 credits – grade 9, 10, 11, 12 – Elective – prerequisite: enrollment in Algebra 2 or Teacher Recommendation

AP Computer Science Principles is an introductory college-level computing course. Students cultivate their understanding of computer science through working with data, collaborating to solve problems, and developing computer programs as they explore concepts like creativity, abstraction, data and information, algorithms, programming, the internet, and the global impact of computing.

 

1831CEFRHS| FRCC Fundamentals of Accounting B:  5 credits/3 college credits – grades 9, 10, 11, 12 – Math or Elective – prerequisite Fundamentals of Accounting A 

ACC 1001: Introduces accounting fundamentals with emphasis on the procedures and practices used in business organizations.  Major topics include the accounting cycle for service and merchandising companies, including end-of-period reporting.

 

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PSD does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, national origin, ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, veteran status, age or disability in access or admission to, or treatment or employment in, its programs or activities. A lack of English speaking skills will not be a barrier to admission or participation.