Where Excellence is Expected

Fort Collins

High School

Where Excellence is Expected

Where Excellence is Expected

Social Studies Course Descriptions

7250 | World History: 10 credits – grades 9, 10 – World Language / Culture or Social Studies -no prerequisite

The World History course takes a true global approach to the study of history, examining multiple civilizations from a variety of cultures including Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. Concepts such as Revolution, Power, Interdependence, Creativity, Identity, and Conflict are emphasized throughout the course. Students use the historical method of inquiry to ask questions, evaluate sources, develop critical thinking skills, and back up interpretations with evidence. In addition to learning about world history, students build a foundation of relevant skills that support success in required social studies courses, as well as in post-secondary life. At FCHS: This course is highly recommended.

 

7265 | AP World History: Modern: 10 credits – grades  9, 10, 11, 12  – Social Studies-Textbook is at College reading level.

 Students will investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from 1200 CE to modern-day. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation.​

 

7266 | College Prep World History: Ancient: 10 credits – grades 9, 10, 11, 12  – Social Studies -Textbook is at College reading level.

Students will investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from Pre-History to 1200 CE. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation. College Board is in the process of developing this course and currently does not offer an AP test. 

 

7210 | World Geography and Culture: 10 credits – grade 10 – Social Studies- no prerequisite

This course is a study of regional geography with a primary emphasis on Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The course analyzes the physical geography, cultural, political, religious, and historical perspective of each region. At FCHS: This course teaches an understanding of spatial perspectives; technologies for spatial analysis; an awareness of the interdependence of the world regions and resources; and how places are connected at the local, national, and global scales. The skills, concepts and knowledge acquired in geography are fundamental literacy components for 21st-century learning. World History remains a highly-recommended course for 9th graders prior to World Geography and Culture.

 

7227 | AP Human Geography: 10 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 (9th with admin approval) – Social Studies – prerequisite: AP Human Geography -Textbook is at College reading level.

The AP geography course will introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to analyze human social organization and its environmental consequences. Students learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in Human Geography. At FCHS: Students should expect 6-10 hours of homework per week. World History remains a highly-recommended course for 9th graders prior to AP Human Geography.

 

7220 | US History: 10 credits – grade 11 – US History – prerequisite: World Geography & Culture

This course is a chronological survey of events and people that characterize each of the major eras in U.S. History. The Eras studied include The Americas to 1600, The Colonial Era, The Revolutionary Era, Nation Building, The Expanding Nation, Civil War and Reconstruction, Development of the Industrial United States, The Progressive Era, Emergence of the United States as a World Power, the 20’s Prosperity and Problems, Depression and New Deal, World War II and Post War United States, and Contemporary United States. The US History course analyzes political, social, economic, religious, and military issues. At FCHS: We highly recommend taking World History before taking US History.

 

7225 | AP US History: 10 credits – grades 11, 12 – US History- prerequisite: US History  Textbook is at College reading level

The AP US History course analyzes political, social, economic, religious, and military issues. The chronology will begin at the pre-Columbus experience and conclude with America as a world power in the late 20th Century. This course requires extensive reading, writing, research, and participation. The reading – text, historical documents, and historiography – is at the college freshman/sophomore level and students may expect to read perhaps 30 pages a week. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in United States History. At FCHS: Students should expect 6-10 hours of homework per week. We highly recommend taking AP Human Geography before taking AP US History.

 

1923 | Introduction to Economics: 5 credits – grades 11, 12 – Economics – no prerequisite

This course is a survey of economics. It is designed as a beginning economics class. The course covers economics theories, supply and demand, national income accounting, money and banking, market structures and contemporary economic issues

 

7230 | Economics: 5 credits – grades 11, 12 – Economics – no prerequisite

As the world's economies become increasingly interdependent  it is essential that students become economic thinkers.  Using micro and macro-economic tools and concepts  students in this course will build the foundation necessary for understanding real-world economic issues.  Students will understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice  market interaction  and public policy.  Units of study include: Economic Thinking  Market Capitalism  The Business Cycle  Monetary Policy  Fiscal Policy  and Global Markets.  The economic foundation built in this course will also enhance understanding of other social science disciplines  such as political science  geography  history  and sociology.  This course fulfills the PSD graduation requirement for Economics.

 

7233 | AP Macro Economics: 5 credits – grades 11, 12 (10th w/ approval) – Economics – no prerequisite

The purpose of this AP course in economics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principals of micro and macroeconomics. Microeconomics studies the functions of individual decision-makers both consumers and producers within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Macroeconomics studies the economic system as a whole. Emphasis is placed on the study of national income and price-level determination. Students are familiarized with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in Macro Economics. Full year Micro/Macro encouraged.

 

7234 | AP Micro Economics: 5 credits – grades 11, 12 (10th w/ approval) – Economics – no prerequisite

The purpose of this AP course in economics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principals of micro and macroeconomics. Microeconomics studies the functions of individual decision makers both consumers and producers within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Macroeconomics studies the economic system as a whole. Emphasis is placed on the study of national income and price-level determination. Students are familiarized with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in Macro Economics. Full year Micro/Macro encouraged.

 

7270 | American Government: 5 credits – grade 12 – Government – prerequisite: US History or AP US History

The focus of this course is U.S. National Government and politics. It will emphasize the institutions and political forces that have shaped the U.S. National Government and examine the behavior of individuals in the American political system and the non-institutional forces that influence decision-making in U.S. politics (such as political parties, interest groups, and the media.) This course enables the student to understand the functions of the U.S. National Government and how citizens can access the decision-making process. Students will gain a fuller understanding of the American political system.

 

7275 | AP US Government: 5 credits – grade 12 – Government – prerequisite: US History or AP US History

The focus of this course is U.S. National Government and politics. It also examines the behavior of individuals and groups in the decisionmaking process and the non-institutional forces that influence United States politics. The reading – text, original documents, government reports, and court cases – is at the college freshman/sophomore level, and students can expect the material to be intellectually challenging. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in United States Government. At FCHS: Students should expect 6-10 hours of homework per week.

 

7272 | AP Comparative Government: 5 credits – grade 12 – Government – prerequisite: US History or AP US History

AP Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to the rich diversity of political life outside the United States. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures; policies; and the political, economic, and social challenges among six selected countries: Great Britain, Mexico, Russia, Iran, China, and Nigeria. Additionally, students examine how different governments solve similar problems by comparing the effectiveness of approaches to many global issues. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement exam in Comparative Government and Politics. At FCHS: Students who enroll must have completed the American Government graduation requirement during the Fall semester.

 

7050 | Current World Affairs: 5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 – Social Studies – no prerequisite

This course is designed to help students develop an objective and analytic method of making decisions about national and international affairs. This course will feature a wide-ranging view of current events with emphasis on discussion, research, and presentations. At FCHS: All issues covered in this course will be social, environmental, or geopolitical in nature. Students will also be provided the opportunity to determine which topics are covered in this class.

 

7240 | Psychology: 5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 – Elective – no prerequisite

Psychology 1 will pursue the fascinating question of why human beings behave as they do. Students consider the role of our biological makeup and our social environment in influencing why we respond as we do to a wide variety of situations. Famous experiments and psychological theories will be studied in an attempt to discover why people develop as they do behaviorally.

 

7246 | AP Psychology: 10 credits – grades 10 (with teacher recommendation), 11, 12 – Elective – no prerequisite

The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. This course is designed to prepare the student to challenge the Advanced Placement Examination in AP Psychology. Reminder: Students do not need Psychology (7240) prior to taking this course.

 

7260 | Anthropology: 5 credits – grades 10, 11, 12 – Elective – no prerequisite

The chief objective of Anthropology is to increase the student's awareness of and appreciation for the rich diversity of human behavior and beliefs. The course examines the physical and cultural origins and development of the human species taking us back in time some three million years. Students will investigate the techniques and evidence used to formulate theories about prehistoric and modern people who possess lifestyles dramatically different from our own. Anthropology is taught from an evolutionary perspective.

 

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